Paul Sutton

STSCI

How Dark is space

This is the October public lecture from the Space Telescope Science Institute

Location: Online Attendance Only Date ;October 5 2021 Time: 7:30 PM – 9:00 PM

Links

Tags

#Science,#Space,#stsci,#Telescope,#Astronomy,#Astrology

Astrology versus Astronomy: What's the Difference, Really?

This is the September public lecture from the Space Telescope Science Institute

Location: Online Attendance Only Date ; September 7 2021 Time: 7:30 PM – 9:00 PM

Links

Tags

#Science,#Space,#stsci,#Telescope,#Astronomy,#Astrology

The Importance of Small Objects: Exocomets

This is the August public lecture from the Space Telescope Science Institute

#Science,#Space,#stsci,#Telescope,#Astronomy

How to Hunt for Distant Worlds

Since the discovery of the first planet orbiting a Sun-like star in 1995, more than 4,000 exoplanets have been found. These widespread planetary systems confirm that our solar system is just one of many in our Milky Way galaxy. The discovery of such systems provided intriguing insights, challenging our perspectives about how planetary systems form and evolve. But how do astronomers search for these exoplanets and what can we find out about them? Join Dr. Rickman as she describes the scientific hunt for these distant worlds.

The lecture starts at about 13:30 minutes in after all the news updates.

Host: Frank Summers, Space Telescope Science Institute Recorded live on Tuesday, June 1, 2021 More information: www.stsci.edu/public-lectures

Very interesting lecture, some of this has been talked about before however it is always good to listen to different explanations of the same topics. The upcoming JWST is hopefully going to open up a lot more discoveries.

The lecture makes reference to the discovery of the moons around Jupiter with the first telescope. Which really puts in to context how quickly things have moved on. First exoplanet was found in 1992, but only recently has the number found increased.

Links at the end to the zooniverse project, two of these projects are to do with searching for exo-planets so this gives citizens a chance to take part (and get cited) in real research.

#Space,#Science,#Telescope,#TheHuntForDistanceWorlds,#STSCI,#stsci

Spacefarers: How Humans Will Settle the Moon, Mars, and Beyond : Writeup

6th April

Speaker: Christopher Wanjek Description: More than 50 years after the Apollo 11 moon landing, why is there so little human presence in space? Will we ever reach Mars? What will it take to become a multi-planet species, colonizing the Solar System and travelling to other stars?

With details here

Write up.

This was another really interesting, thought provoking lecture presented by Christopher Wanjek

The lecture started at about 15:30 in to the video after Frank has given his introduction, details of upcoming lectures and also an update on space news.

So some of the items covered were the cost and difficulty of getting off Earth in to space, then on to the Moon, very expensive. However once there, we are not out of the woods, the lunar surface is bombarded with radiation, the moon dust itself is toxic, growing food would need to be undertaken under artificial light, due to the radiation.

As the temperature on the moon can fluctuate between -200 and +200 F then one course of action for establishing some sort of presence on the moon would be the poles, where the temperature is a “cold, but workable” -50c.

We can harvest ice to produce Water, which can also be converted in to Hydrogen and Oxygen,

Christopher also then looked at how we can develop science on the Moon, Geology, Biology.

A look at gravity and how much humans rely on Gravity and how this can perhaps be created artificially.

The European Space Agency are looking at sending pods to the moon, build something before we go, I think it was also suggested we need to cover any buildings with moon dust, in order to provide full shielding from radiation. This apparently needs to be about 1 meter thick layer. Bare in mind that the dust is like Asbestos. Getting around and some transportation systems were suggested.

We may need to live in caves as these would be a constant temperature and a shield against radiation.

Space tourism could potentially be a huge industry As We are unable to have children on the Moon (something to do with gravity) then building cities may not be practical.

So on to Mars

Firstly getting there is dangerous, we are potentially exposed to radiation over a long period of time, once there the surface is still bombarded with radiation and there are dust storms to contend with, However it was suggested we could live in caves

One way of protecting us from radiation is to use Boron Nitriade, as boron can absorb secondary particles .

Mars surface has toxic components, so we may have to grow food under LED lights.

So lots to think about, lots of challenges a head so a great time to discuss more, study science and help work on the solutions needed.

A lot more was discussed including design of space suits,

Thank you for reading, worth checking out the video and the book Spacefarers by Christopher.

You can find more upcoming (monthly) lectures below.

Updates:

#video,#astronomy,#space,#science,#stsci

Spacefarers: How Humans Will Settle the Moon, Mars, and Beyond

6th April

Speaker: Christopher Wanjek Description: More than 50 years after the Apollo 11 moon landing, why is there so little human presence in space? Will we ever reach Mars? What will it take to become a multi-planet species, colonizing the Solar System and traveling to other stars?

With details here

You can find more upcoming (monthly) lectures below.

http://www.stsci.edu/public-lectures

#video,#astronomy,#space,#science,#stsci

Spacefarers: How Humans Will Settle the Moon, Mars, and Beyond

6th April

Speaker: Christopher Wanjek Description: More than 50 years after the Apollo 11 moon landing, why is there so little human presence in space? Will we ever reach Mars? What will it take to become a multi-planet species, colonizing the Solar System and traveling to other stars?

With details here

You can find more upcoming (monthly) lectures below.

http://www.stsci.edu/public-lectures

#video,#astronomy,#space,#science,#stsci

Astronify testing

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Back in 2020 I attended a Space Telescope Science Institute lecture on Astronify and wrote a review on this.

I an going to attempt to test the software out, so the first task is to install python-pip

May as well install this for both python and python3

apt install python-pip python-pip-whl python3-pip python3-pipdeptree

pip install astronify
Collecting astronify
  Could not find a version that satisfies the requirement astronify (from versions: )
No matching distribution found for astronify

Astronify is on pypy so it makes sense to perhaps do a apt search on this:-

I found the following package

pypi2deb

apt install pypi2deb has quite a few extra requirements so may take a while

man page for pip also points to

pip search

so tried to do a search for astronify but the package seems to crash,

pip search astronify
Exception:
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/pip/_internal/cli/base_command.py", line 143, in main
    status = self.run(options, args)
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/pip/_internal/commands/search.py", line 48, in run
    pypi_hits = self.search(query, options)
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/pip/_internal/commands/search.py", line 65, in search
    hits = pypi.search({'name': query, 'summary': query}, 'or')
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/xmlrpclib.py", line 1243, in __call__
    return self.__send(self.__name, args)
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/xmlrpclib.py", line 1602, in __request
    verbose=self.__verbose
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/pip/_internal/download.py", line 791, in request
    return self.parse_response(response.raw)
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/xmlrpclib.py", line 1493, in parse_response
    return u.close()
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/xmlrpclib.py", line 800, in close
    raise Fault(**self._stack[0])
Fault: <Fault -32500: "RuntimeError: PyPI's XMLRPC API has been temporarily disabled due to unmanageable load and will be deprecated in the near future. See https://status.python.org/ for more information.">

So at first glance this may not seem useful, the error is more useful to anyone who understands it. Next step would be to ask on some forums for help.

REFERENCES

TAGS

#YearOfTheFediverse,#Astronify,#Astronony,#STSCI,#Data,#Sonification,#ESA,#Hubble,#Research

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Astronify follow up

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Back in 2020 I attended a Space Telescope Science Institute lecture on Astronify and wrote a review on this.

I found this as a result of another post on Mastodon earlier today from Khurram Wadee. This is the sonification of the Pillars of creation, within the Eagle Nebula. This nicely illustrates how the research of the Astronify team works.

There is also a video about this nebula here which is interesting.

I have included some related links below, including a link to the Qoto Mastodon instance, and the related Discourse forum where you can discuss a range of STEM topics.

Lots of research going on, which is really exciting. If you want to learn more, the Open University offer courses within the Space Sciences.

REFERENCES

TAGS

#YearOfTheFediverse,#Astronify,#Astronony,#STSCI,#Data,#Sonification,#TheOpenUniversity,#ESA,#Hubble,#Research

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February STSCI lecture review

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This months lecture Milky Way vs Andromeda: When galaxies collide. was really interesting, and covered material about how galaxies are formed, looking for life and what may happen when in 7 billion years, the Andromeda galaxy merges with our own, home galaxy.

The lecture also talked about how galaxies were first discovered and how, only in the last 100 years have we really started to learn a lot more about them. Why the two will merge is linked to the expansion of the universe.

Earth, of course, won't exist by then. The sun, being 4 billion years old, will have expanded to a red giant. As the duration of a 'main sequence star' is about 10 billion years (cite OU Open Learn The Sun)

So the lecture also included about how we could find earth 2.0, the fact that this. may not be easy given the time it will take to reach even the nearest start.

Proxima Centauri (4.2ly) and the planet around that isn't very hospitable.

Personal comment to add to this

I would guess it also raises the question if it will take 10's of 1000s of years to reach will it be the same or have developed to be more life friendly, then on the other side of that a planet that is life friendly now, may like the Earth not be so friendly i 1000's of years time.

Looking forward to the next lecture in March.

REFERENCES

TAGS

#YearOfTheFediverse,#galaxies,#space,#Telescope,#stsci,#Science,Physics,#Astronomy

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License